PROP Reports

Want to learn more about unfair and unjust NYPD policies and practices?

This page contains a regularly updated list of reports created and issued by PROP on objectionable policing in New York and the collateral consequences it has on individuals and communities.

These reports include input from New York residents, researchers and analysis of stats and the economic cost of policing of NYPD.

You can also read these reports on Medium, via PROP’s own publication.


“Nearly 1,800,000 Per Year: Punitive Interactions Between the NYPD and New Yorkers” – PROP compiled statistics—all obtained from the NYPD and other government agencies—for the main purpose of concretely and substantively demonstrating the extensive and intrusive nature of the NYPD’s punitive interactions with New Yorkers on a daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly basis. “For the people who’d put a positive spin on the drop in the NYPD punitive interaction numbers,” said PROP director Robert Gangi, “we refer to a relevant comment from Malcolm X: ‘If you stick a knife nine inches into my back & pull it out three inches, that is not progress.’”

No Equal and Exact Justice – A PROP Court Monitoring Report – In preparing No Equal and Exact Justice, PROP representatives observed and recorded proceedings in 16 NYC arraignment parts involving nearly 530 cases, and interviewed defendants as well as the public defenders who practice in those parts. By identifying the most prevalent types of arrests coming through the criminal justice system and the individuals charged for those infractions, PROP effectively assessed the NYPD’s everyday practices and has concluded that the NYPD continues to engage in an aggressive application of a type of “broken windows” policing that does serious harm to selected communities in our city.

90%: The Harm Continues – A breakdown of 524 cases presented in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Bronx arraignments parts between May and August 2015 showing that 90% of defendants were people of color and 86% walked out of court. Based on information recorded by PROP at each of the cases and including stories of defendants and a list of what they are arrested for.

Nearly 2,000,000 per Year, Punitive Interactions Between the NYPD and New Yorkers – An overview of the problems associated with the vast number of punitive interactions (including summonses, traffic tickets, and arrests) that occur between New Yorkers and the NYPD, and overwhelmingly affect New Yorkers of color.

That’s How They Get You: New Yorkers’ Encounters With Broken Windows Policing – A lengthy report detailing vignettes of New Yorkers’ interaction with the NYPD as part of the enforcement of Broken Windows policing. This report gives life to the stories that Broken Windows creates in New York City, a stark counterpoint to the publicized positive impact of the policy as espoused by the NYPD and the Mayor’s office.

Short Report: The Case Against the NYPD’s Quota-Driven ‘Broken Windows’ Policing – An overview of the problems with Broken Windows policing as applied by the NYPD and the reforms needed to combat its pervasive effects on the New Yorkers most affected.

Short Report: Over $1 Million Per Day – A Day The NYPD ‘broken-windows’ approach to policing, means that every day the police charge, confine, and criminalize hundreds of people of color for minor infractions. In its latest report, Over $1 Million Dollars A Day, PROP analyzed and compared NYPD arrest statistics. At a million dollars or more per day, these law enforcement practices result in a significant waste of resources that would be better spent on collaborative, neighborhood-based law enforcement programs and social services that address the social and economic problems that drive unlawful behavior.

Over $410 Million A Year: The Human and Economic Cost of Broken Windows Policing – In our latest report, PROP analyzed NYPD arrest statistics and NYC court disposition data and reached major findings regarding misdemeanor arrest practices and what those practices are costing our city, socially and financially.

Everyday : NYC’s Cops and Courts Inflict Harm and Hardship – Our newest short-report is follow up short-report to its summer publication, Broken Windows Policing: A True Tale of Two Cities, that presented the initial findings of the organization’s court monitoring efforts. In preparing the report, PROP representatives observed and recorded proceedings in 5 NYC arraignment parts involving over 190 cases and interviewed both public defenders that practice in those parts and defendants. By identifying the most prevalent types of arrests coming through the criminal justice system and who is charged for those infractions, PROP effectively assesses the NYPD’s everyday practices and has concluded that they continue to entail aggressive application of a kind of “broken windows” policing that does serious harm to selected communities in our city.

Short-Report: Working Towards a More Safe and Fair City: Abolishing Quotas and Involving Communities – PROP has released a short-report that sharply criticizes the NYPD’s quota system for evaluating officers’ performance, stating that it “creates an incentive for harmful and counterproductive police practices.” The report calls on the de Blasio/Bratton administration to institute a new NYPD management approach that rewards officers for constructive interactions with New Yorkers such as meeting with local leaders and tenant groups, settling disputes, and directing people in need, the mentally ill for example, to helpful services.

Broken Windows Policing: A True Tale of Two Cities (a Court Monitoring Project Report) – Our newest report consists of the initial findings from PROP’s Court Monitoring Project, documenting the continuing harmful and biased effects of NYPD’s Broken windows policing. The Court Monitoring Project was developed to independently monitor NYPD practices on the ground. PROP representatives have observed and recorded proceedings in over 20 New York City arraignment and summons parts involving over 750 cases and have interviewed both public defenders that practice in those parts and defendants. By identifying the most prevalent types of arrests and summonses coming through the criminal justice system and who is charged for those infractions, PROP has effectively assessed the NYPD’s everyday practices and concluded that they continue to entail aggressive application of a kind of “broken windows” policing that does serious harm to selected communities in our city.

Changing the NYPD: A Progressive Blueprint for Sweeping Reform – The main intent of PROP’s most recent report is to urge & convince the de Blasio administration to implement substantive reforms to address the harmful practices of the NYPD that routinely and disproportionately affect our city’s low income communities and people of color.

In Their Own Words: The Biggest Gang Here in New York City – This report is the second in our “In Their Own Words” Series. It presents quotes from New Yorkers who have been the victims of police abuse, and shows the human cost of unjust police.

Short-Report: Criminalizing Communities: NYPD Abuse Of Vulnerable Populations – PROP’s January 2013 policy paper written in collaboration with the Leitner Center for International Law and Justice at Fordham Law School. It chronicles NYPD abuses and their damaging effects against New York’s most vulnerable communities and recommends administrative and legislative reforms

Short-Report: “New York City’s Failure: Harsh, Unjust Police Tactics” – PROP’s June 2011 policy paper presenting our central critiques of the NYPD’s policies and practices.

In Their Own Words – This report presents incriminating quotes by officers of the New York Police Department (NYPD), providing evidence, in their own words, of the illegal tactics and racially biased attitudes endemic to the daily operations of the Department.